Course Descriptions


Epidemiology


I. HSC-542: Linear Regression

The primary objective of this course is to provide a hands-on introduction to applied multiple linear regressions. Emphasis will be placed on interpreting computer output on linear regression, and developing intuition about the appropriateness, constraints and limitations of linear regression methods.
Topics to be covered include:
Gauss-Markov assumptions and their substantive meaning; Parameter and associated confidence interval estimation; Interpretation of interactions; Dummy variable; Selecting the best regression equation; Goodness of fit; Hypothesis testing; Relationship to ANOVA;A brief introduction to multi-level modeling.
Students will be given an opportunity to work through numerous health related examples and will have to use computer packages (SPSS and STATA) throughout the course.
Reference:
i. Draper N. R. & Smith F.H: Applied Regression Analysis, Wiley, New York.
ii. D. C. Montgomery: Regression Analysis, Wiley & Sons, New York.
iii. Cook, R. Dennis, Weisberg, Sanford: An introduction to regression graphics, Book Series: Wiley series in probability and mathematical statistics .Publisher: New York: Wiley, c1994.

II. HSC-543: Logistic Regression

The primary objective of this course is to provide a hands-on introduction to applied logistic regression. Emphasis will be placed on interpreting computer output on logistic regression, and developing intuition about the appropriateness, constraints and limitations of logistic regression methods.
Topics to be covered include:
Linear probability models and their constraints; Odds ratios and their relationship to logistic regression; Parameter/coefficient and associated confidence interval estimation; Model building Strategies and Methods for Logistic Regression: Variable selection, Stepwise and Best Subsets Logistic Regression; Goodness of fit and log likelihood ratios; Interpretation of coefficients as odds ratios; Interpretation of interaction terms; Hypothesis testing; Testing of confounding by sequential logistic regression and A brief introduction to discrete time event history models.
Students will be given an opportunity to work through numerous health related examples and will have to use computer packages (SPSS and or STATA) throughout the course.
Reference:
i. David W Hosmer and Stanley Hemeshow:Applied Logistic Regression, John Wiley & Sons.
ii. David W. Hosmer:Applied Survival Analysis: Regression Modeling of Time to Event Data, Wiley Series in Probability and Statistics.
iii. Stephen C. Newman:Biostatistical Methods in Epidemiology, John Wiley & Sons, 2003.
iv. Elisa T. Lee and John Wang:Statistical Methods for Survival Data Analysis, Wiley Series in Probability and Statistics.

III. HSC-544: Population & Health Services Projections

The primary objective of this course is to provide some specialized projections which are very much needed in the in sector population and health services. The course will consider major classes of projection and simulation models that are currently in use and the underlying data sources and research inputs for these models. It will also consider areas in which additional research and data are needed to inform model development and health care policy analysis more broadly.
Topics to be covered include:
Population projections based on different variants of fertility, mortality, migration and contraceptive prevalence; Implications of using various computer-based projection models and techniques; Contraceptive requirement projections; School population projection; Health human resources development (HRD) projections; Health resources requirement projections; Appropriate use of projections in policy and program planning; Integration of Population variables in development Policies, Plans and Programs;trends in socioeconomic status and in mortality and morbidity and how they affect health care cost projections; medical technology as a driver of costs and the policy responses to this trend.
Note: students will be taught standard computerized projection models, their advantages and limitations.
Reference:
i. ChadesHongara and Barbara Mcpake,“How to bridge the gap in Human Resources in Health”, .Lnacet, Volume 364: Page 1451-1456.
ii. PascalZurin, Mario R DalPoz, Barbara Stiwed and OrvillAdams,“Imbalance in the Health Workforce”. Journal of Bio Me4d Central.
iii. Syed Masud Ahmed, Md. Awalossain, Ahmed Mustaque Raja Chowdhury and Abbas Bhuiya, “The health workforce crisis in Bangladesh:Shortage,inappropriate skill mix and inequitable distribution” ,Journal of Bio Med Central.

Course Outline will be updated soon